Parution de l’ouvrage Cycling Cities : the European experience – soutien et présentation du cas lyonnais

Its our pleasure to bring the new book Cycling Cities: The European Experience. One Hundred Years of Policy and Practiceto your attention. The book is the first outcome of the international research and teaching programhttps://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif Sustainable Urban Mobility, 1890-present (SUM). This program is initiated by Eindhoven University of Technology and the Foundation for the History of Technology in collaboration with an international consortium of universities, government agencies, businesses, and social organizations.  Cycling Cities provides a unique long-term and transnational perspective for everyone interested in today’s urban mobility, sustainability, and cycling. The book offers policymakers, community groups, politicians, scholars, and teachers a new understanding of the patterns behind the development of cycling in urban traffic.
 
Attached you will find the press release and the cover. More information can be found on www.cyclingcities.info.
Best regards,
 
 
Jan Korsten
Foundation for the History of Technology
 
Citizens and policy makers boost cycling in the city
 
From London and Paris to Barcelona and Berlin, authorities seek to boost cycling and make their cities more livable. Some cities have managed to create a lasting result. In others, urban cycling is barely increasing. Cycling Cities brings us over a hundred unique photos and maps, richly illustrating why only some capitals and business centers became realcycling cities. Covering a century of cycling policy and practice in 14 European cities in nine countries, this work  shows how policy makers, activists, and ordinary citizens make—and have made—a difference.
 
The 14 case studies in Cycling Cities provide a fascinating new insight into how urban areas developed their own uniquecycling culture‒from the capitals Antwerp, Amsterdam, Budapest, Copenhagen, and Stockholm, to the industrial hubs Eindhoven, Lyon, Manchester, and Southeast Limburg, and the business towns Basel, Enschede, Hannover, Malmö, and Utrecht.
 
Over the past century, local European policymakers curtailed or encouraged cycling. They mandated the building or destruction of cycling infrastructures; they granted or outright denied cyclists’ rights to all roads, creating public transit systems in competition or in tandem with walking and cycling.
 
The international authors trace the role of authorities and engineers as well as cyclists and community groups in creating local cycling policies and practices. They show how these local outcomes resonated in transnational debates on urban mobility and livability alongside traffic management and safety. They compare the urban areas’ vividly varying histories of embracing pedestrians, cyclists, and motorists.
 
Cycling Cities provides a long-term and transnational perspective for everyone interested in today’s urban mobility, sustainability, and cycling. The book offers policymakers, community groups, politicians, scholars, and teachers a new understanding of the patterns behind the development of cycling in urban traffic.
 
Cycling Cities is the first outcome of the international research and teaching programhttps://ssl.gstatic.com/ui/v1/icons/mail/images/cleardot.gif Sustainable Urban Mobility, 1890-present (SUM). This program was initiated by Eindhoven University of Technology and the Foundation for the History of Technology in collaboration with an international consortium of universities, government agencies, businesses, and social organizations.

 

 
 
Ruth Oldenziel, Martin Emanuel, Adri Albert de la Bruhèze, and Frank Veraart (Editors)
Cycling Cities: The European Experience. One Hundred Years of Policy and Practice
Published by Foundation for the History of Technology and LMU Rachel Carson Center for Environment and Society
256 pages, richly illustrated and full color
ISBN 978-90-73192-46-1
Price €37,50 (handling costs not included)
Available viawww.cyclingcities.info
About the Author
Maxime Huré est Maître de Conférences en science politique à l’université de Perpignan Via Domitia, chercheur au CDED et chercheur associé au laboratoire Triangle (UMR 5206). Spécialiste des politiques de mobilité durable (bicyclette, déplacement piéton, nouvelles mobilités), et des relations entre institutions et grandes entreprises de services urbains, il anime des formations sur l’innovation dans les politiques de transport au sein de plusieurs entreprises, écoles d’ingénieurs et universités. Ses compétences portent plus généralement sur les politiques de mobilité, les politiques énergétiques, la sociologie de l’action publique, les grands groupes privés et les méthodes qualitatives. Il a également ouvert un chantier de recherche sur la gouvernance des projets de tours et sur les acteurs de l’immobilier. Il travaille actuellement sur la diffusion des systèmes de vélos en libre service, les dispositifs d’autopartage, les systèmes ferroviaires en France et aux Etats-Unis et les mobilités périurbaines. En 2015, il a reçu le prix jeune chercheur de la ville de Lyon. En 2016, il a été boursier de la fondation Palladio pour l’immobilier.

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